To Inform Street Vending Regulations, LA County to Begin Comprehensive and Collaborative Community Outreach

LOS ANGELES, CA – Sidewalk vending provides a living for vendors and is a growing industry throughout California. In response to this growth, a recently enacted state law (SB 946) creates new restrictions on street vending regulations and encourages local governments to adopt requirements tailored to their jurisdiction. Today, the Board of Supervisors approved a motion authored by Los Angeles County Supervisor Hilda L. Solis, and co-authored by Supervisor Janice Hahn, to solicit stakeholder feedback and identify best practices to shape the County’s evolving street vending regulations.

 

“Sidewalk vendors and brick-and-mortar businesses are all entrepreneurs that contribute to our local economy,” said Supervisor Solis. “Today’s action creates a welcoming space so that all stakeholders are lifted up, heard, and inform LA County’s future street vending regulations. I am confident that we will identify a path forward that safeguards public health while encouraging all businesses to grow and thrive.”

 

“For years, we have been trying to find a balance between street vendors who are really just trying to make a living, and the brick-and-mortar businesses that have had to deal with unregulated, unpermitted competition,” said Supervisor Hahn. “We are at a point now where we can support our sidewalk vendors, make sure we protect health and safety, and balance the needs of local restaurants.”

 

Today’s motion directs County Departments to solicit feedback from and identify the needs of sidewalk vendors, brick-and-mortar businesses, and community residents. LA County will also engage other jurisdictions and agencies to review and identify best practices and policies. In light of SB 946, the County will develop a comprehensive, integrated, and collaboration-driven set of policies and programs that will be presented to the Board of Supervisors by May 31, 2019.

 

SB 946 prohibits local jurisdictions from regulating where sidewalk vendors may operate or requiring that sidewalk vendors ask permission from brick-and-mortar businesses to operate. SB 946 does allow for local regulations that are necessary to ensure health, safety, and welfare, including limited hours, requiring sanitary conditions, ADA compliance, and mandating a permit and/or a license.

By |2018-11-07T19:18:15+00:00November 7th, 2018|Categories: economic and workforce development, In the news, Press Release|0 Comments